Monthly Archives: April 2018

The Tavistock Festival

~Tavistock Festival – from the original painting by Celia Duncan~

The Tavistock Music and Arts Festival is in full swing. Do take a look through the brochure and take part in some of the events on offer, especially if you are planning to visit Dartmoor over the next few weeks. You can find the online brochure here.

Author Sophie Neville giving talks at the Tavistock Festival in Devon - Literary Festivals

The talk and Q&A on ‘The Making of Swallows and Amazons (1974)’ went down well, with audiences made up of Arthur Ransome enthusiasts, those who loved both the old film and the Lake District. There were also young people interested in acting and film-making who said they had watched the DVD a number of times.  One couple remembered Titty Altounyan who had lived in Coniston and was so well-loved by the people of the Lake District.

Questions included: ‘How did you get the part of Titty?’, ‘What was the most difficult scene to film?’ and ‘Where did you stay when you were filming?’ The answers, of course, can be found in ‘The Making of Swallows and Amazons’ published by The Lutterworth Press.

~Sophie Neville after opening the Tavistock Festival: photo-Helena Ancil~

The Plymouth Pipe Band heralded the beginning of the festival outside the Church of St Eustachius where the Chamber Ensemble of London played later that evening.

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Christopher Kirwin, Chairman of the Festival, took me to Tavistock Library where I found a copy of ‘Swallows and Amazons’.

They had created a display of Arthur Ransome books, including a vintage copy of Robinson Crusoe, and now have ‘The Making of Swallows and Amazons’ on their shelves.

Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

 

Was he a Devon lad? I forget! After being interviewed by the Tavistock Times, I was called on to open the Festival in the portrait room at The Bedford Hotel when I met the Trustees and President, the composer Andrew Wilson. It was good to see Simon Dell, an expert on Dartmoor, who will be giving a talks and leading walks during the festival.  I first met him in 2015 when visiting Lundy Island with The Arthur Ransome Society.

On Sunday 22nd April, the original film of ‘Swallows and Amazons’ was screened at The Wharf Cinema on the Tavistock Canal. We held a book signing directly afterwards, when festival members gathered to chat about films and film reviews, books and book reviews, along with all manner of things.

I met David Harrison, the projectionist, who told me that he first screened the movie when it came out in 1974. He worked at the Drake Cinema in Plymouth from 1967 to 2000 and is quite an expert on film with what sounded like an impressive private collection of DVDs. Dave told me I was ‘His favourite girl’ in the movie and presented me with a bunch of narcissi.

~Sophie Neville at the Wharf cinema with David Harrison~

In the foyer of The Wharf, where Virginia McKenna once gave a talk on making her iconic movie ‘Born Free’, they have new star: a glitzy otter called Rosie who was happy to pose wearing a red Amazon hat. She is one of many otters made for the Moor Otter Trail, that is becoming popular with visitors. You can read how they raised £126,000 for Dartmoor National Park here.

Sophie Neville with Rosie the Otter at The Wharf Cinema for the Tavistock Festival~Sophie Neville, Patron of the UK Wild Otter Trust: photo-Helena Ancil~

You can see pictures of the otters hand-reared by my family here

The Chairman of the Tavistock Festival, Christopher Kirwin, chatted to Belinda Dixon on BBC Radio Devon’s Sunday morning programme for about thirty minutes. You can listen to this, 1hr.26mins into the programme here:

 

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Filed under Film History, filmography, Memoir, Movie, Movie stories, News, Otters, questions about filmmaking, Scouts, Swallows & Amazons, Swallows and Amazons, titty, Titty in Swallows and Amazons, Uncategorized, Vintage Film

Rowing The Queen’s Barge Gloriana in the Boat Race Flotilla

If you were able to watch the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race or catch it on BBC Television, you might have caught sight of the Queen’s Row Barge Gloriana, her gold dolphins glaring at the dark water of the Thames.

She led the Boat Race Flotilla ahead of the actual races, a warm-up act for the crowds waiting along the bank for the great event.

We were promoting the Future Blues – a new year-round community outreach project that aims to increase the total number of school rowing clubs in the UK by 50%. The Boat Race Company say, ‘We hope this initiative will leave a legacy of not only social upliftment but diversity and education for the future.’

I was fortunate enough to join the crew as they rowed from Chiswick Pier up to Putney Bridge on the morning of 24th March. I wore the black cap of my rowing club, City Barge and the red shirt of the Gloriana:

After taking a stroll past the Putney boatsheds where the television cameras were lining up under the sponsors’ banners, we rowed our passengers down the official four-mile course. I’m on the right of this shot (above) wearing a black City Barge cap.

The Men’s Boat Race, from Putney to Mortlake, was established in 1845 and has also been used for The Women’s Boat Race since 2015.

Map of the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race

We were joined by standing-up oarsmen from City Barge, rowing Italian and Maltese vessels, while other rowing clubs joined us in Thames skiffs and a variety of other traditional craft.

They added colour to a grey day in March and brought life to the River Thames reminding onlookers of her past glory.

Glimpses of this was depicted on the cabin walls of the Gloriana, while hand-painted pictures of water birds adorned the ceiling.

Food and drinks were laid on for our guests including excellent English sparkling wine, which has become a feature of the day.

The Gloriana from the water

 

While the men’s eights to row the course in under 17 minutes, it took us 52 minutes to reach Chiswich Bridge in the Gloriana.

11 We follow Glorianna

However, we were pulling 9 tons. Since we were a crew of 18 oarsmen, we each pulling the equivalent of half a ton, against the stream but with the tide.

Rowing the Gloriana through London

We also had more than twenty passengers on board – representatives from schools nearby who hope to participate in the Future Blues scheme.

Rowing the Gloriana under Chiswick Bridge

 

We were watched by thousands crowded along the riverside. The big thing was to keep together, which his trickier that you might imagine given the curve of the hull.

The White Hart pub on the Thames

The challenge was in raising our oars to salute almost every crowded pub or boat-house along the route.

Saluting

The wooden oars are 16 foot long and quite a weight. I look at myself now (thrid from the right in a black cap) and wonder how I did it.

Gloriana salute on the Thames

I have managed to lift my oar in Venice after rowing the Voga Longa and in Nantes after rowing 45 kilometres through Brittany but I found it tricky in the Gloriana.

Our cox was gracious but it was clear I need more practice. I got there in the end.

Once under Chiswick Bridge we were able to wait for the racing eights to come through after the finish.

We had been asked to grace the back of shot for the BBC coverage of the event,

which put us in a prime position to watch the crews pull in and gather for the prize-giving.

We almost became part of the antics that otherwise could only be seen on television

Cambridge University won both the Men’s and Women’s races with ease and enjoyed traditional celebrations despite the cold.

You can watch the coverage of the event on BBC iPlayer here

It was great to have taken part in such an exciting a national event. Many thanks to Malcolm Knight and The Queen’s Row Barge Gloriana for having me.

Sophie Neville on the crew of the Queen's Row Barge Gloriana~Sophie Neville in the QRB Gloriana~

 

with additional photos by Richard Bailey of City Barge

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Filed under boating, Sophie Neville, truelife story, Uncategorized